IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute

ivl.se
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    de Jong, Annelise
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Borisova, Stanislava
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Hallberg, Lisa
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Sondal, Jonas
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Molin, Elvira
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Lidfeldt, Matilda
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    LCA Systemanalys av återanvändbara förpackningar för take-away mat och dryck2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is reported by IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute on behalf of the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency and investigates the environmental impact of reusable packaging for takeaway food and beverages. The report serves as a basis for a government assignment carried out by the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency and the National Food Agency to produce guidance and guidelines for reusable food boxes and cups (M2021/02087). In the new regulation (2021: 996) on disposable products, increased requirements for reuse of packaging are in place from January 2024 including registration of reuse systems at the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency. There are also requirements for actors to inform their customers about the environmental impact of the use of disposable packaging and about the benefits of reduced consumption of the packaging.

    The Swedish Environmental Protection Agency has commissioned this study to develop knowledge on the environmental impact of reusable packaging and to show advantages of these over single-use packaging, based on the entire life cycle from the manufacture of reusable packaging to several use cycles, and waste management. Materials that were analyzed for mugs are fossil-based plastics, biobased plastics, and steel, and for boxes materials are fossil-based plastics, biobased plastics, glass, and steel.

    A system analysis (LCA) was applied to answer the following questions in the study:

    How (when and how) brought reusable cups and lunchboxes should be used?

    Which materials for reusable cups and lunchboxes should be used to maximize environmental benefits?

    Results show that raw material extraction dominates for all material alternatives, except for fossil plastics where the incineration in the waste stage also has a significant climate impact. If not accounting for the fact that glass or steel can be used more times than plastic, glass and steel have a much higher impact than plastic due to higher weight since steel also has a greater climate impact per kg of material when manufacturing the material. Still the study signals that fossil-based plastic (in this study PP) is probably the worst material from a climate point of view, which is largely due to the fact that incineration of the container sooner or later contributes to fossil climate impact.

    The bio-based plastic alternative is good from a climate point of view, mainly because the combustion of a bio-based material does not contribute to fossil climate impact, but also because the impact of production of the material is lower, although this is uncertain as the data used in this study is based on an LCA published by a single supplier. For steel packaging the challenge in the analysis was partly to try to do this material justice as it can be used more times than the plastic materials, but also that it has been difficult to define a product weight that is representative in comparison with the other materials. The study also shows that glass (which is only related to food boxes in this study) is a good option. The choice of material for mugs or boxes is thus important and should involve consideration of the durability of the material(s) in terms of number of usages.

    Transport has a relatively small impact overall, but the transport to "users" is visible even if it means less than the cleaning. The heavier the mug/box is, the greater the impact from transport. The cleaning is an important part but is relatively small compared to the raw material phase of packaging production. Non-centralized cleaning has not been analyzed but should give a lower impact (due to no transport), but possibly a higher impact (due to less efficiency), and this could possibly weigh each other out, but has not been analysed. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Johansson, Kristin
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Halling, Maja
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Celebi, Merve
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Rydberg, Tomas
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    A comparative life cycle assessment and toxicity evaluation of impregnated railway sleepers2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A comparative life cycle assessment (LCA) of impregnated wooden sleepers is presented in this report. The included impregnation oils are linseed oil and creosote, and the environmental aspects considered here are climate change, ecotoxicity, human toxicity and the use of fossil resources. 

    The results of the LCA indicate that the carbon footprint of the linseed oil sleeper is equal to or higher than the carbon footprint of creosote. The main contributors to the linseed oil’s carbon footprint are emissions of nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide from the use of fertilizers on the farmland and carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels used in tractors, lorries and for the production of steam and electricity used in the production process. 

    Considering the ecotoxicity and human toxicity, the results indicate that the creosote sleeper performs worse than the linseed oil sleeper, which might be expected. However, depending on how the environmental burdens of linseed oil, linseed cake and straw are allocated between them (mass or economical allocation) the results for the linseed oil sleeper vary to a large extent. 

    The results are associated with some uncertainties: for example, no full-scale production plant for linseed oil sleepers exist today meaning that the input data to some extents are based on estimations. To reduce the carbon footprint of sleepers impregnated with linseed oil, a few measures were identified.

    For example, by changing from diesel in tractors and trucks in the agriculture of linseed, as well as natural gas in the production process to renewable fuels. The carbon footprint can also be decreased by reusing the sleepers after their use phase. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    A comparative life cycle assessment and toxicity evaluation of impregnated railway sleepers
  • 3. Larsson, Mats-Ola
    et al.
    Hedvall, Klas
    Lindkvist, Linnea
    Carlsson, Anna
    Bilars optimala livslängd - Effekter av personbilars livslängd på klimat, emissioner, värdefulla material och trafiksäkerhet2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Studien analyserar personbilars livslängd utifrån klimat, kväveoxider, partiklar, värdefulla material och trafiksäkerhet.

    En snabbare omsättning kan minska dödsrisker och olycksrisker, växthusgasutsläpp och kväveoxider. Samtidigt skulle behoven av värdefulla material öka.

    Beräkningar redovisas med ett bokföringsperspektiv men konsekvensanalyser görs även på systemnivå i perspektiven global och europeisk utsläppspolitik och svensk reduktionsplikt, samt med monetära värderingar.

    Studien fann inte någon omsättningstakt som vore optimal utifrån alla dessa aspekter. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    Bilars optimala livslängd IVL CIT 2023
  • 4.
    Liljenroth, Anna
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Gunnarsson, Josefin
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Hallberg, Elisabet
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Tegstedt, Fredrik
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    EPD-vägledning och företagsanpassning av EPD-verktyg: En pilotstudie tillsammans med medlemmar inom Trä- och Möbelföretagen2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport är den andra och sista rapporten från ett forskningsprojekt som finansierats av Trä- och Möbelföretagen (TMF) och Stiftelsen IVL.

    I projektet har IVLs EPD-verktyg anpassats åt ett flertal medlemmar inom segmentet kök, badrum och möbler. Som resultat kan dessa företag efter projektet prova på att skapa produktspecifikt underlag för EPD via verktyget. Arbete har även innefattat framtagande av en arbetsprocess för företagsanpassning av EPD-verktyget och vilken demonstrerats genom företagens medverkan i projektet. Utöver detta har nödvändiga  branschgemensamma miljödata identifierats och tillgängliggjorts i verktyget.

    En vägledning har även tagits fram i projektet som syftar till att pedagogiskt beskriva EPD, hur de kan skapas och hur informationen i dem kan tillämpas. Vägledningen riktar sig främst till företag som planerar eller nyligen påbörjat sitt arbete med EPD (IVL-rapport B2432).  

    Det sammantagna arbetet och resultatet av projektet sammanfattas i denna rapport.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Mata, Erika
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Melolinna, Nelli
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Larsson, Helena
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Climate mitigation: Buildings. Summary of Working Group III contribution to the 6th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The buildings and construction sector plays a key role in achieving social, environmental, and economic goals. To urgently bring about the significant changes required in the sector to achieve climate goals, all stakeholders require access to updated knowledge to ensure that they can easily make choices that are aligned with the goals.

    To achieve this aim, this report summarizes the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report of Working Group (WG) III’s contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), 'Mitigation of Climate Change', Chapter 9 'Buildings'.

    The chapter shows that global CO2 emissions from buildings increased by 50% from 1990 to 2019. By retrofitting existing buildings and using efficient techniques to reduce climate impact in new construction, it is possible to approach net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Actions by 2030 are crucial to fully capture the potential for reduced climate impact from buildings.

    The transition of the building sector requires strong collaboration with many other sectors, as it is closely linked to sectors such as the energy sector, land use, resource utilization, and waste management. This requires ambitious policy packages, such as the use of renewable energy sources, as well as efficient design and use of space, energy, materials, and appliances.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Climate mitigation: Buildings Summary of Working Group III contribution to the 6th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Chapter 9
  • 6.
    Miliute-Plepiene, Jurate
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Sundqvist, Jan-Olov
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Cirkulär hantering av schaktmassor: Miljönytta eller miljöpåverkan?2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to raise awareness about excavated materials and highlight the potential for increased climate and environmental benefits through a more circular, resource-efficient and sustainable management. The report describes the current situation in Sweden regarding the management of excavated materials and the corresponding virgin production, as well as common terms used. The evaluation of excavated material recycling includes both quantitative and qualitative assessments compared to landfilling or virgin production. Climate aspects are quantitatively evaluated by measuring CO2e emissions per ton of waste in different scenarios. Other environmental aspects are qualitatively addressed through literature analysis, where recycling is compared overall to landfilling and new production.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Söderqvist, Johan
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Hellquist, Gruv Stina
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Utveckling av hållbarhetskriterier för möbelbranschen2022Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Möbelfakta is a sustainability label for furniture with regard to quality, environment and responsible supply chains. It is the leading labeling system for public procurement of furniture in Sweden and thus has a major impact on the sustainability requirements set within the public sector.In this report, we look at the importance of increased sustainability requirements from the outside world and future opportunities in digitization to create circular flows for furniture and exemplify how the furniture industry can meet this through the development of Möbelfakta's criteria.

    In the short term, Möbelfakta needs to deal with upcoming EU legislation regarding due diligence for human rights, the environment and society. It needs to be linked to market players' digital product catalogs and developed to put greater focus on circular processes. In order to establish more circular processes in the furniture industry, product information needs to accompany a product throughout its entire life cycle. The key to achieving this is digital information management to be able to create traceability when products change hands, are refurbished or become waste.In the medium term, Möbelfakta needs to embrace the various initiatives for the EU's green initiative. There, the digital product passport today appears to be the most important initiative in the broadening of the EU Ecodesign directive.

    It is important that Möbelfakta is one of the labels that can be used for furniture according to the EU's new taxonomy. The Substantiating Green Claims initiative is also directly relevant, while the Product Environmental Footprint (PEF) still lacks a direct connection to furniture. Here it looks like the development going forward continues to be the Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) for reporting climate performance.In the longer term, a global harmonization of the requirements for quality and the environment should be sought by e.g. taking into account the lifetime of products and hazards instead of prohibition lists. This can be done through dialogue with procuring authorities where the benefits should lie in more companies being able to meet requirements that are relevant to procurement and thereby increasing competition in the market. Since there are many stakeholders, this happens continuously in several steps in the short to long term.We also see a need for industry collaboration to establish a common standard for digital traceability. The major challenge for the industry is the many configurations that can be made on each product. This leads to the need for standardization of digital product information and the first step is to gather the furniture producers to make a joint decision about which way the industry should go.

    It will be important for the furniture industry to find the party in the industry who can lead and control the initial work of gathering the furniture producers.Of equal importance to the industry is that Möbelfakta's criteria can be used as a verification in public procurement. This means that an environmental label must be able to show that products or services in the label meet requirements set by an independent third party, that the requirements are constantly tightened and that they develop from a life cycle perspective. To meet this, a criteria council has been established for Möbelfakta.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf