IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute

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  • 1.
    De Jong, Annelise
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Fjellander, Liv
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Sharing Communities - Final report 20212021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, many people are used to sharing historically, having open access to large public spaces and the right of public access, as well as functions such as care, sports halls, laundries and waste management, mobility such as public transport and products, such as in libraries, parks, and leisure centers. Sharing stuff, transport, spaces, time and knowledge has the potential to contribute to a number of sustainability gains, both ecological, social and economic.

    Based on identified success factors and pitfalls, we describe what to consider when it comes to collaboration with residents, collaboration with actors, collaboration internally and collaboration with the district within sharing. A guide has been developed for Stockholmshem primarily for area managers, customer service and central support functions within the housing company for collaborative dialogues about sharing, but which is open to other housing companies to use. The guide provides seven steps to increase the opportunities for sharing between residents and businesses in residential areas:

    1.  Make an inventory

    2.  Set sustainability goals

    3.  Create dialogue

    4.  Design and develop

    5.  Support engagement and growth

    6.  Develop support systems

    7.  Support independence and further development

    The project has been led by IVL Swedish Environmental Institute in collaboration with Stockholmshem, IIIEE Lund University and ÅWL Architects. It has been implemented as a strategic project within Sharing Cities Sweden, part of the strategic innovation program Viable Cities for smart and sustainable cities, which is supported in a joint initiative by Vinnova, the Swedish Energy Agency and Formas.

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  • 2.
    Hennlock, Magnus
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Waara, Oskar
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Karlsson, Annacarin
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Bäckström, Sebastian
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Holm, Fredrik
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Kloo, Henrik
    Undersökning om långtidsavställda fordon2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie undersöker status och användning av över 900 000 långtidsavställda personbilar och lätta lastbilar i Sveriges vägtrafikregister.

    Resultaten, baserade på statistiska analyser, intervjuer och enkäter, visar en varierad användning.

    Cirka en tredjedel av fordonen betraktas som samlarobjekt och en tiondel har skrotats. En översyn av nationell reglering rekommenderas för effektivare registrering av fordon och som adresserar miljörisker samtidigt som behoven för historiska fordon beaktas.

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  • 3.
    Karlsson, Annacarin
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Eriksson, Flintull Annica
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Zetterberg, Lars
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    von Bahr, Jenny
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Rootzén, Johan
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Möllersten, Kenneth
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Kloo, Henrik
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Bragadóttir, Hrafnhildur
    Use of economic instruments in Nordic environmental policies 2018-20212023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The report contains two parts. Part 1 summarizes the most significantdevelopments in the use of economic instruments in the environmental policies inthe Nordic countries. It provides an overview of new instruments or major changesto existing instruments from 2018 to 2021 a detailed country-by-countrydescription of these developments and a cross-country comparison andassessment. Part 1 also provides “raw data” for further analysis by policymakersand other stakeholders, and presents other findings, including policy priorities andgood practices. Part 2 provides an overview overview of policies and instrumentsthe Nordic countries have used to promote clean technologies.

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  • 4.
    Lindgren, Oskar
    et al.
    Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hahn, Thomas
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Malmaeus, Mikael
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute. IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Exploring sufficiency in energy policy: insights from Sweden2023In: Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, E-ISSN 1548-7733, Vol. 19, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy efficiency and renewable energy strategies have been insufficient in achieving rapidand profound reductions of energy-related greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions. Consequently,energy sufficiency has gained attention as a complementary strategy over the past twodecades. Yet, most research on energy sufficiency has been theoretical and its implementationin policy limited. This study draws on the growing sufficiency literature to examine thepresence of sufficiency as a strategy for reducing energy-related GHG emissions in Sweden,a country often regarded as a “climate-progressive” country.

    By conducting a keyword andcontent analysis of energy policies and parliamentary debates during four governmentalterms of office (2006–2022), this research explores the extent to which sufficiency is integratedinto Swedish energy policy, as well as potential barriers to its adoption. The analyses revealeda scarcity of sufficiency elements. Although some policies could potentially result in energysavings, they are infrequent and overshadowed by the prevailing emphasis on efficiency andrenewable energy.

    Furthermore, Sweden lacks a target for sufficiency or absolute energyreductions. The main impediments to sufficiency implementation include the disregard ofscientific evidence in the policy-making process and the perceived contradiction betweensufficiency and industrial competitiveness. This study thus concludes that sufficiency at bestremains at the periphery of Swedish energy policy. Given the reinforced ambitions withinthe European Union, this raises questions regarding the validity of Sweden’s reputation asa climate-progressive country.

  • 5.
    Malmaeus, Mikael
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Hasselström, Linus
    Mellin, Anna
    Nyblom, Åsa
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Åkerman, Jonas
    Addressing rebound effects in transport policy – Insights from exploring five case studies2023In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 131, p. 45-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although rebound effects are well-known as a phenomenon, the question of how to avoid and minimize rebound effects have largely been ignored in practical policy.

    In this study, five concrete cases of measures and policies in the transport sector illustrate primary effects, rebound effects and possible strategies to avoid or minimize rebound effects.

    The cases were explored and analyzed in a series of workshops involving in total 15 researchers and societal actors. In addition to the net impact of primary and rebound effects, factors such as the time horizon and the reversibility of the effect may also be important for the evaluation of measures and policies.

    To detect and avoid rebound effects – and to assess the effectiveness of a policy – a system perspective is needed rather than a narrow sector focus. When designing measures, broad system-wide strategies or specific measures addressing particularly emission-intensive activities tend to be most effective for avoiding rebound.

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  • 6.
    Sanne, J. M.
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Matschke Ekholm, H.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rahmberg, M.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Contextualizing resilience indicators – comparable across organizations yet specific to context2021In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 1652-1667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an increasingly complex and interdependent world, it has become increasingly difficult and costly to identify and protect systems, communities or organizations against all possible threats. Resilience approaches, however, provide capacities or abilities to respond to hazards and threats beyond existing scenarios and associated response plans, as well as learn from these disturbances and improve performance.

    Thus, resilience approaches provides increased capabilities for strengthening beyond traditional risk, crisis and business continuity approaches. However, there are inherent challenges of contextualizing resilience indicators for specific uses for specific critical infrastructures while also designing a comprehensive and multidimensional approach as well as for comparison across various infrastructures. Based upon the development and application of an indicator-based decision-support system for resilience in a Horizon 2020 project, we describe and analyse how we addressed such challenges, providing opportunities for improving resilience for drinking water supply and distribution in Sweden.

    The findings show the value of a modular approach, iterative indicator design processes with relevant stakeholders, the necessity to attend to their organizational processes, to the regulatory context as well as to the assignments, evaluation criteria and cognitive regimes among various target audiences. The approach is a useful methodology to achieve policy objectives for critical infrastructures from a systemic perspective, such as identifying and evaluating resilience, development of measures to increase resilience and the development of performance metric as well as facilitating information-sharing and training.

  • 7. Söderqvist, Tore
    et al.
    Nathaniel, Hanna
    Franzén, Daniel
    Franzén, Frida
    Hasselström, Linus
    Gröndahl, Fredrik
    Sinha, Rajib
    Stadmark, Johanna
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Strand, Åsa
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Ingmansson, Ida
    Lingegård, Sofia
    Thomas, Jean-Baptiste
    Cost–benefit analysis of beach-cast harvest: Closing land-marine nutrient loops in the Baltic Sea region2021In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Harvesting beach-cast can help mitigate marine eutrophication by closing land-marine nutrient loops and provide a blue biomass raw material for the bioeconomy. Cost–benefit analysis was applied to harvest activities during 2009–2018 on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea, highlighting benefits such as nutrient removal from the marine system and improved recreational opportunities as well as costs of using inputs necessary for harvest.

    The results indicate that the activities entailed a net gain to society, lending substance to continued funding for harvests on Gotland and assessments of upscaling of harvest activities to other areas in Sweden and elsewhere. The lessons learnt from the considerable harvest experience on Gotland should be utilized for developing concrete guidelines for carrying out sustainable harvest practice, paying due attention to local conditions but also to what can be generalized to a wider national and international context.

  • 8.
    Åström, Stefan
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Kindbom, Karin
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    EUA-BCA   Stakeholder Analysis Report2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The stakeholder analysis was done to identify which stakeholders would be important in the process to Increase coordination of Arctic black carbon policies and to some extent to Facilitate early emission reductions of black carbon affecting the Arctic. The analysis included 95 Arctic-relevant stakeholders, categorised in six groups: Intergovernmental organisations, National authorities, Indigenous people’s organisations, Expert and working groups, Non-governmental organisations, and Industry. 

     The analysis supporting the results above was made by quantitatively ranking each stakeholder over three dimensions: Power, Interest, and Network capacity. The stakeholder analysis indicates that there are some stakeholders that appear more important to include in the process to increase coordination of Arctic black carbon policies and to facilitate early emission reduction of black carbon affecting the Arctic.

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1 - 8 of 8
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