IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute

ivl.se
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Moldan, Filip
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Heuck, C
    Smolka, G
    Whalen, ED
    Frey, S
    Gundersen, P
    Fernandez, IJ
    Spohn, M
    Effects of long-term nitrogen addition on phosphorus cycling in organic soil horizons of temperate forests2018In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is expected to impair phosphorus (P) nutrition of temperate forest ecosystems. We examined N and P cycling in organic soil horizons of temperate forests exposed to long-term N addition in the northeastern USA and Scandinavia. We determined N and P concentrations, enzyme activities and net N and P mineralization rates in organic soil horizons of two deciduous (Harvard Forest, Bear Brook) and two coniferous (Klosterhede, Ga°rdsjo¨n) forests which had received experimental inorganic N addition between 25 and 150 kg N ha-1 year-1 for more than 25 years. Long-term N addition increased the activity of phosphatase (? 180%) and the activity of carbon (C)- and N-acquiring enzymes (cellobiohydrolase: ? 70%, chitinase: ? 25%). Soil N enrichment increased the N:P ratio of organic soil horizons by up to 150%. In coniferous organic soil horizons, net N and P mineralization were small and unaffected by N addition. In deciduous organic soil horizons, net N and P mineralization rates were significantly higher than at the coniferous sites, and N addition increased net N mineralization by up to 290%. High phosphatase activities concomitant with a 40% decline in P stocks of deciduous organic soil horizons indicate increased plant P demand. In summary, projected future global increases in atmospheric N deposition may induce P limitation in deciduous forests, impairing temperate forest growth.

  • 2.
    Moldan, Filip
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Heuck, C.
    Smolka, G.
    Whalen, ED.
    Frey, S.
    Gundersen, P.
    Fernandez, IJ.
    Spohn, M.
    Effects of long-term nitrogen addition on phosphorus cycling in organic soil horizons of temperate forests.2018In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 2018, no 141, p. 167–181-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effects of long-term nitrogen addition on phosphorus cycling in organic soil horizons of temperate forests. The paper summarize four long-term N-addition experiments from US and from Europe,where Gårdsjön, Sweden is one of the two conifer sites.

  • 3.
    Moldan, Filip
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Veerman, L.
    Kalbitz, K.
    Gundersen, P.
    Kjönaas, J.
    Schleppi, P.
    Van Loon, E.E.
    Schoorl, J.
    Wessel, W.
    Tietema, A.
    The long-term fate of deposited nitrogen in temperate forest soils.2020In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 150, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased anthropogenic nitrogen (N) inputs can alter the N cycle and affect forest ecosystem functions. The impact of increased N deposition depends among others on the ultimate fate of N in plant and soil N pools. Short-term studies (3–18 months) have shown that the organic soil layer was the dominant sink for N. However, longer time scales are needed to investigate the long-term fate of N. Therefore, the soils of four experimental forest sites across Europe were re-sampled ~ 2 decades after labelling with 15N. The sites covered a wide range of ambient N deposition varying from 13 to 58 kg N ha−1 year−1. To investigate the effects of different N loads on 15N recovery, ambient N levels were experimentally increased or decreased. We hypothesized that: (1) the mineral soil would become the dominant 15N sink after 2 decades, (2) long-term increased N deposition would lead to lower 15N recovery levels in the soil and (3) variables related to C dynamics would have the largest impact on 15N recovery in the soil. The results show that large amounts of the added 15N remain in the soil after 2 decades and at 2 out of 4 sites the 15N recovery levels are higher in the mineral soil than in the organic soil. The results show no clear responses of the isotopic signature to the changes in N deposition. Several environmental drivers are identified as controlling factors for long-term 15N recovery. Most drivers that significantly contribute to 15N recovery are strongly related to the soil organic matter (SOM) content. These findings are consistent with the idea that much of the added 15N is immobilized in the SOM. In the organic soil layer, we identify C stock, thickness of the organic layer, N-status and mean annual temperature of the forest sites as most important controlling factors. In the mineral soil we identify C stock, C content, pH, moisture content, bulk density, temperature, precipitation and forest stand age as most important controlling factors. Overall, our results show that these temperate forests are capable of retaining long-term increased N inputs preferably when SOM availability is high and SOM turnover and N availability are low.

  • 4. Verstraeten, Arne
    et al.
    Bruffaerts, Nicolas
    Cristofolini, Fabiana
    Vanguelova, Elena
    Neirynck, Johan
    Genouw, Gerrit
    De Vos, Bruno
    Waldner, Peter
    Thimonier, Anne
    Nussbaumer, Anita
    Neumann, Mathias
    Benham, Sue
    Rautio, Pasi
    Ukonmaanaho, Liisa
    Merilä, Päivi
    Lindroos, Antti-Jussi
    Saarto, Annika
    Reiniharju, Jukka
    Clarke, Nicholas
    Timmermann, Volkmar
    Nicolas, Manuel
    Schmitt, Maria
    Meusburger, Katrin
    Kowalska, Anna
    Kasprzyk, Idalia
    Kluska, Katarzyna
    Grewling, Łukasz
    Malkiewicz, Małgorzata
    Vesterdal, Lars
    Ingerslev, Morten
    Manninger, Miklós
    Magyar, Donát
    Titeux, Hugues
    Karlsson, Gunilla Pihl
    Gehrig, Regula
    Adriaenssens, Sandy
    Ekebom, Agneta
    Dahl, Åslög
    Ferretti, Marco
    Gottardini, Elena
    Effects of tree pollen on throughfall element fluxes in European forests2023In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 165, no 3, p. 311-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of tree pollen on precipitation chemistry are not fully understood and this canlead to misinterpretations of element deposition in European forests. We investigated the relationship between forest throughfall (TF) element fluxes and the Seasonal Pollen Integral (SPIn) using linear mixed-effects modelling (LME). TF was measuredin 1990–2018 during the main pollen season (MPS,arbitrary two months) in 61 managed, mostly pure, even-aged Fagus, Quercus, Pinus, and Picea stands which are part of the ICP Forests Level II network.

    The SPIn for the dominant tree genus was observed at 56 aerobiological monitoring stations in nearby cities. The net contribution of pollen was estimated as the TF flux in the MPS minus the fluxes in the preceding and succeeding months. In stands of Fagus and Picea, two genera that do not form large amounts of flowers every year, TF fluxes ofpotassium (K+), ammonium-nitrogen (NH4 +-N), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) showed a positive relationship with SPIn. However- for Fagus- a negative relationship was found between TF nitrate-nitrogen (NO3−-N) fluxes and SPIn.

    For Quercus and Pinus, two genera producing many flowers each year, SPIn displayed limited variability and no clear association with TF element fluxes. Overall, pollen contributed on average 4.1–10.6% of the annual TF fluxes of K+ > DOC > DON > NH4 +-N with the highest contribution in Quercus > Fagus > Pinus > Picea stands. Tree pollen appears to affect TF inorganic nitrogen fluxes both qualitatively and quantitatively, acting as a source of NH4 +-N and a sink of NO3 −-N. Pollen appears to play a more complex role in nutrient cycling than previously thought. 

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf