IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute

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  • 1. Abbasi, Umar Aftab
    et al.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Nissanka, Sarath Premalal
    Ali, Arshad
    Biological, structural and functional responses of tropical forests to environmental factors2022In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 276, p. 109792-109792, article id 109792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we hypothesize that the biological, structural and functional attributes of tropical forests respond to water-related climatic and soil nutrient-related factors.

    Thus, we quantified 27 forest attributes and 20 environmental factors across 189 plots of Sri Lankan tropical forests. Our results suggest that environmental conditions were characterized by both water-related and temperature-related factors, and as such, both coarse-textured and compacted-structured soils determined soil conditions.

    Forest conditions were characterized by high species-functional diversity, structural complexity and aboveground biomass-related functions. We found strong positive effects of water-related climatic factors followed by temperature-related climatic factors but negligible positive to negative effects of textured-related and nutrient-related soil factors on most of the biological, structural and functional attributes.

    Overall the biodiversity and carbon stocks of Sri Lankan tropical forests are likely to increase with water-energy balance and improved soil conditions, and thus, studied forests could offset a substantial quantity of anthropogenic carbon emissions to achieve carbon neutrality which can have both regional and global significance if protected from anthropogenic disturbances. 

  • 2. Abbasi, Umar Aftab
    et al.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Nissanka, Sarath Premalal
    Ali, Arshad
    Species α-diversity promotes but β-diversity restricts aboveground biomass in tropical forests, depending on stand structure and environmental factors2022In: Journal of Forestry Research, ISSN 1007-662X, E-ISSN 1993-0607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forest plays a vital role in the global biogeochemical cycles through a high rate of carbon sequestration and harboring biodiversity. However, local species diversity is declining while also becoming increasingly homogenized across communities. Although effects of local biotic processes (e.g., species α-diversity and stand structural heterogeneity) and environmental factors on aboveground biomass (AGB) have been widely tested, there is a huge knowledge gap for the effect of regional biotic processes (i.e., taxonomic and functional β-diversity) in forests. Here, we hypothesized that regional and local environmental factors along with biotic processes jointly regulate AGB through species shifts in tropical forests.

    Using piecewise structural equation modeling (pSEM), we linked climatic water availability, soil fertility, stand structural heterogeneity (either tree DBH inequality, height inequality, or stand density), species α-diversity, taxonomic or functional β-diversity (and its two components; β-turnover and β-richness), and AGB across 189 inventory plots in tropical forests of Sri Lanka. Soil fertility and climatic water availability shaped local and regional biotic processes. Stand structural heterogeneity promoted species α-diversity but declined β-diversity (but increased β-taxonomic turnover). Species α-diversity and stand structural heterogeneity promoted AGB whereas taxonomic and functional β-diversity declined (but β-taxonomic turnover increased) AGB.

    The relationships of AGB with species α-diversity and β-diversity varied from significant to nonsignificant positive depending on the specific combinations of stand structural heterogeneity metrics used. This study shows that local biotic processes could increase AGB due to the local and regional niche complementarity effect whereas the regional biotic processes could restrict AGB due to the regional selection or functional redundancy effect under favorable environmental conditions. We argue that biotic homogenization, as well as drought conditions, may have strong divergent impacts on forest functions and that the impacts of tree diversity loss may greatly reduce carbon sequestration.

  • 3.
    Ali, Arshad
    et al.
    Hebei University.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Nissanka, Sarath Premalal
    Big-sized trees and species-functional diversity pathways mediate divergent impacts of environmental factors on individual biomass variability in Sri Lankan tropical forests2022In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 315, p. 115177-115177, article id 115177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we used the Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Models (PLS-SEMs), and other complementary analyses, on data from 189 tropical forest plots in Sri Lanka, to test the linkages amongst climate, soil, plot conditions, big-sized trees, species-functional diversity, and abiotic and biotic effects on individual biomass variability (BioVar). This study suggests that individual tree biomass variability (i.e., BioVar) should be considered for managing natural tropical forests in the context of the plant-plant interactions for species coexistence.

  • 4.
    Erlandsson, Martin
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Holmström, Hampus
    SLU.
    Karlsson, Per Erik
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Neuwirth, Josefin
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Nilsson, Åsa
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Underlagsdata för hållbarhetsbedömning i BioMapp2024Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report constitutes the overall documentation of the data available in the visualization tool BioMapp with regards to various industrial processes. The forest industrial processes described in the report are based on a generally accepted inventory methodology to describe the environmental impact of forest-based products and other sustainability indicators in a life cycle perspective. The system analysis tool used in the project is life cycle analysis (LCA) in the way it is applied in environmental product declarations (EPD).These inventory data are representative in the type of processes and environmental impact that are relevant to Swedish conditions. However, it has not been possible within the framework of the project to make complete industry summaries.

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  • 5.
    Erlandsson, Martin
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Harris, Steve
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Munthe, John
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Aktuell praxis och mest lovande ansatser för livscykelbaserade cirkuläritets- och hållbarhetsindikatorer2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    IVL bidrar med metodutveckling och inventering för analys av olika hållbarhetsindikatorer i projektet Mistra Digital Forest. Denna rapport beskriver det inledande arbetet i Task 3.1. Vi beskriver här en konceptuell metodik för att kunna inkludera flera hållbarhetsteman i livscykelbaserade systemanalysmetoder. En speciell utmaning kopplat till skogsprodukter är att inkludera biologisk mångfald i skogsbruk , så att åtgärder som ger upphov till förbättrat också fås med i bedömningsunderlaget.

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  • 6.
    Erlandsson, Martin
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Nilsson, Jeanette
    Negativa klimatutsläpp genom användning av biogena kolsänkor2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    By 2045 at the latest, Sweden climate goal is that there we will not contribute with any net emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, and this requires that we also must be able to build climate-neutral buildings in the future. Malmö wants to be a forerunner, and in the initiative local roadmap Malmö 2030 (LFM30) aims to be climate neutral already by 2030. The built environment today accounts for about one fifth of Sweden's total climate impact. In order to achieve climate-neutral buildings, 'genuine' negative emissions are important, i.e. measures that actually reduce the level of carbon dioxide in the air and not just avoid emissions.

    One way we already now can create negative climate emissions directly in the construction phase is to work with biogenic carbon sinks. We can do this, for example, by using bio-based materials such as biochar that are used, for example, in concrete or in a plant bed or in the soil as a pure sink. Other options include building with wood or other renewable materials. In this report, we develope supporting data so that the orders of magnitude of these sinks can be assessed. We have done this by developing a methodological approach based on accounting LCA that is compatible with the methodology already applied in LFM30 to calculate the significance of the wood built into a building (Erlandsson 2020). According to this methodological approach, the carbon balance of the forest is analyzed at the landscape level. For planted plants, therefore, by analogy, the carbon that is stored on average during the analysis period in the plantings made including the supplement from biochar is calculated. For individual urban trees, the methodology has been developed to take into account that the trees grow, creating a biogenic carbon sink, which extends over the 50 years of the analysis period.

    The methodology means that what is tied into each analysis period can be credited to the project's climate budget. In this way, no double accounting occurs while the benefit of preserving large trees in the built environment is strengthened.The report contains key figures and examples to enable a more uniform calculation so that the person who will make calculations in the future, in the absence of specific supporting data, can make the same assumption. We have also given a calculation example that shows that an apartment building made of solid wood that meets the target limit values set in LFM30 can, by planning plants and including biochar in the plant beds, already today – with products that can be bought – achieve a climate-neutral building. In this case, the climate impact of the construction phase is fully compensated by negative emissions in the form of biogenic carbon sinks.

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  • 7.
    Johansson, Henrik
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Perjo, Liisa
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Näringslivets arbete med biologisk mångfald: En kartläggning av företagens strategiska arbete och uppföljning2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute has on the behalf of Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, conducted a review of how Swedish companies work with biodiversity. The purpose of the review was to gain knowledge and identify good examples on how companies can develop their strategic work on biodiversity, and how they can follow up and measure their impacts on biodiversity. An important part of the review has also been to highlight obstacles and success factors for companies’ biodiversity work. The review aims to inspire more companies to work with and follow up biodiversity, and to highlight actions that the business sector can take in order to achieve Sweden’s environmental quality objectives.

    Even though this review only includes interviews with nine companies, the results clearly indicate a complexity of measuring and following up companies’ impacts on biodiversity. 

    The interviewed companies continuously emphasise the importance of analysing and addressing the impacts on biodiversity throughout the whole value chain. Companies can also use the knowledge, processes and lessons-learned from their climate-related actions to establish strategic work with biodiversity and to create a follow-up framework. Although it is important that biodiversity is discussed alongside climate change as a dual challenge, it is important to be careful with the differences between these two areas.

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  • 8.
    Jucker, Tommaso
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute. School of Biological Sciences University of Bristol Bristol UK.
    Fischer, Fabian Jörg
    School of Biological Sciences University of Bristol Bristol UK.
    Chave, Jérôme
    Laboratoire Évolution et Diversité Biologique (EDB) UMR 5174 (CNRS/IRD/UPS) Toulouse Cedex 9 France;Université Toulouse Toulouse Cedex 9 France.
    Coomes, David A.
    Conservation Research Institute University of Cambridge Cambridge UK.
    Caspersen, John
    Institute of Forestry and Conservation University of Toronto Toronto Ontario Canada.
    Ali, Arshad
    Forest Ecology Research Group, College of Life Sciences Hebei University Baoding Hebei China.
    Loubota Panzou, Grace Jopaul
    Université de Liège, Gembloux Agro‐Bio Tech Gembloux Belgium;Laboratoire de Biodiversité, de Gestion des Ecosystèmes et de l'Environnement (LBGE), Faculté des Sciences et Techniques Université Marien Ngouabi Brazzaville Republic of Congo.
    Feldpausch, Ted R.
    College of Life and Environmental Sciences University of Exeter Exeter UK.
    Falster, Daniel
    Evolution & Ecology Research Centre University of New South Wales Sydney Sydney New South Wales Australia.
    Usoltsev, Vladimir A.
    Department of Forestry Ural State Forest Engineering University Yekaterinburg Russia;Department of Forest Dynamics Botanical Garden of the Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences Yekaterinburg Russia.
    Adu‐Bredu, Stephen
    Forestry Research Institute of Ghana, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research University Kumasi Ghana.
    Alves, Luciana F.
    Center for Tropical Research, Institute of the Environment and Sustainability University of California Los Angeles Los Angeles California USA.
    Aminpour, Mohammad
    Natural Recourses and Watershed Management Office, West Azerbaijan Province Urmia Iran.
    Angoboy, Ilondea B.
    Institut National pour l'Etude et la Recherche Agronimiques Democratic Republic of the Congo.
    Anten, Niels P. R.
    Center for Crop Systems Analysis Wageningen University Wageningen The Netherlands.
    Antin, Cécile
    AMAP Lab Montpellier University, IRD, CIRAD, CNRS, INRAE Montpellier France.
    Askari, Yousef
    Research Division of Natural Resources, Kohgiluyeh and Boyerahmad Agriculture and Natural Resources Research and Education Center, AREEO Yasouj Iran.
    Muñoz, Rodrigo
    Departamento de Ecología y Recursos Naturales, Facultad de Ciencias Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán Ciudad de México Mexico;Forest Ecology and Forest Management Group Wageningen University Wageningen The Netherlands.
    Ayyappan, Narayanan
    Department of Ecology French Institute of Pondicherry Puducherry India.
    Balvanera, Patricia
    Instituto de Investigaciones en Ecosistemas y Sustentabilidad, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México Morelia Michoacán Mexico.
    Banin, Lindsay
    UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology Edinburgh UK.
    Barbier, Nicolas
    AMAP Lab Montpellier University, IRD, CIRAD, CNRS, INRAE Montpellier France.
    Battles, John J.
    University of California Berkeley Berkeley California USA.
    Beeckman, Hans
    Service of Wood Biology Royal Museum for Central Africa Tervuren Belgium.
    Bocko, Yannick E.
    Laboratoire de Biodiversité, de Gestion des Ecosystèmes et de l'Environnement (LBGE), Faculté des Sciences et Techniques Université Marien Ngouabi Brazzaville Republic of Congo.
    Bond‐Lamberty, Ben
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Joint Global Change Research Institute College Park Maryland USA.
    Bongers, Frans
    Forest Ecology and Forest Management Group Wageningen University Wageningen The Netherlands.
    Bowers, Samuel
    School of GeoSciences University of Edinburgh Edinburgh UK.
    Brade, Thomas
    School of GeoSciences University of Edinburgh Edinburgh UK.
    van Breugel, Michiel
    Yale‐NUS College Singapore;ForestGEO Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Apartado Panama Republic of Panama;Department of Geography National University of Singapore Singapore.
    Chantrain, Arthur
    Université de Liège, Gembloux Agro‐Bio Tech Gembloux Belgium.
    Chaudhary, Rajeev
    Division Forest Office Ministry of Forest Dhangadhi Sudurpashchim Province Nepal.
    Dai, Jingyu
    College of Urban and Environmental Sciences and MOE Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes Peking University Beijing China.
    Dalponte, Michele
    Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach San Michele all'Adige Italy.
    Dimobe, Kangbéni
    Institut des Sciences de l'Environnement et du Développement Rural (ISEDR) Université de Dédougou Dédougou Burkina Faso.
    Domec, Jean‐Christophe
    Bordeaux Sciences Agro‐UMR ISPA, INRAE Bordeaux France;Nicholas School of the Environment Duke University Durham NC USA.
    Doucet, Jean‐Louis
    Université de Liège, Gembloux Agro‐Bio Tech Gembloux Belgium.
    Duursma, Remko A.
    Shinto Labs Eindhoven The Netherlands.
    Enríquez, Moisés
    Departamento de Ecología y Recursos Naturales, Facultad de Ciencias Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán Ciudad de México Mexico.
    van Ewijk, Karin Y.
    Department of Geography and Planning, Queen's University Kingston Ontario Canada.
    Farfán‐Rios, William
    Department of Biology Washington University in St Louis St Louis Missouri USA.
    Fayolle, Adeline
    Université de Liège, Gembloux Agro‐Bio Tech Gembloux Belgium.
    Forni, Eric
    CIRAD, UPR Forêts et Sociétés Montpellier France.
    Forrester, David I.
    CSIRO Land and Water Canberra Australian Capital Territory Australia.
    Gilani, Hammad
    Institute of Space Technology, Islamabad Highway Islamabad Pakistan.
    Godlee, John L.
    School of GeoSciences University of Edinburgh Edinburgh UK.
    Gourlet‐Fleury, Sylvie
    CIRAD, UPR Forêts et Sociétés Montpellier France.
    Haeni, Matthias
    Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL Birmensdorf Switzerland.
    Hall, Jefferson S.
    ForestGEO Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Apartado Panama Republic of Panama.
    He, Jie‐Kun
    Spatial Ecology Lab, School of Life Sciences South China Normal University Guangzhou Guangdong China.
    Tallo: A global tree allometry and crown architecture database2022In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 28, no 17, p. 5254-5268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data capturing multiple axes of tree size and shape, such as a tree's stem diameter, height and crown size, underpin a wide range of ecological research—from developing and testing theory on forest structure and dynamics, to estimating forest carbon stocks and their uncertainties, and integrating remote sensing imagery into forest monitoring programmes. However, these data can be surprisingly hard to come by, particularly for certain regions of the world and for specific taxonomic groups, posing a real barrier to progress in these fields.

    To overcome this challenge, we developed the Tallo database, a collection of 498,838 georeferenced and taxonomically standardized records of individual trees for which stem diameter, height and/or crown radius have been measured. These data were collected at 61,856 globally distributed sites, spanning all major forested and non-forested biomes. The majority of trees in the database are identified to species (88%), and collectively Tallo includes data for 5163 species distributed across 1453 genera and 187 plant families. The database is publicly archived under a CC-BY 4.0 licence and can be access from: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6637599.

    To demonstrate its value, here we present three case studies that highlight how the Tallo database can be used to address a range of theoretical and applied questions in ecology—from testing the predictions of metabolic scaling theory, to exploring the limits of tree allometric plasticity along environmental gradients and modelling global variation in maximum attainable tree height. In doing so, we provide a key resource for field ecologists, remote sensing researchers and the modelling community working together to better understand the role that trees play in regulating the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  • 9.
    Karlsson, Per Erik
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Erlandsson, Martin
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Nilsson, Åsa
    Klimatpåverkan från skogsbruk inom Sveaskogs produktiva skogsmark2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The biogenic and fossil climate impacts that results from forestry were estimated within the productive forests that are owned by the forest company Sveaskog, in different parts of Sweden. These results were compared with the results from corresponding calculations made for all productive forests that are present in the same parts of Sweden. The calculations showed a biogenic uptake of CO2 to the forest ecosystems in the productive forests owned by Sveaskog in all parts of Sweden. The estimated area based net uptake of CO2 was higher for the productive forests owned by Sveaskog, compared the estimated values for all productive forests present for all different parts of Sweden, except south Norrland. The estimated, area based emissions of fossil GHG were somewhat lower in the productive forests of Sveaskog, as compared to the corresponding estimates for all productive forests in the different parts of Sweden, except for south Norrland.

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  • 10.
    Karlsson, Per Erik
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Erlandsson, Martin
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Nilsson, Åsa
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Holmström, Hampus
    Dialogprocesser kring hållbarhetsbedömningar inom svenskt skogsbruk2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Inom forskningsprogrammet Mistra Digital Forest (MDF) utvecklas metoder för att med ett hållbarhetsperspektiv beskriva och visualisera alternativa, framtida scenarier för produktion och användning av skogsråvara, för dagens och framtidens skogsbruk. Utveckling av metodik för att tillämpa indikatorer för hållbarhet för svensk skoglig sektor utgör en viktig verksamhet. I denna rapport redovisas argument för behovet av en nationell samverkan mellan intressenter i det svenska samhället vad gäller metodik för bedömningar och målsättningar för hållbarhet för framtida utveckling inom svensk skoglig sektor.

    Vi föreslår att det nationella skogsprogrammet, med ett tilläggsuppdrag och utformat med inspiration från andra framgångsrika arenor, till exempel Luftkonventionen, och lett av en oberoende nationell samordnare, skulle kunna härbärgera en nationell arena för dialoger kring samverkan om utveckling av beräkningsmetoder samt definitioner av indikatorer för hållbarhet för svensk skoglig sektor, med en bred förankring i det svenska samhället.

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  • 11.
    Karlsson, Per Erik
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Erlandsson, Martin
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Nilsson, Åsa
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Holmström, Hampus
    Indikatorer för hållbarhetsbedömningar av svenskt skogsbruk och skogsindustriella produkter: Generell metodik2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Rapporten har tagits fram inom forskningsprogrammet Mistra Digital Forest som leds av Skogsindustrierna. IVL deltar i programmet, i samarbete med SLU och Skogforsk, med att beskriva alternativa, framtida scenarier för produktion och användning av skogsråvara, för dagens och framtidens skogsbruk, i ett hållbarhetsperspektiv, främst baserat på visualiseringsverktyget BioMapp Framtagning av metodik för att beräkna hållbarhetsindikatorer för svensk skoglig sektor utgör en viktig verksamhet.

    Metoder har tagits fram för att beräkna fyra olika typer av hållbarhetsindikatorer:

    1. Påverkan på biologisk mångfald                                                                            2. Påverkan på klimat, uppdelat på fossilt och biogent ursprung                                  3. Sociala aspekter, såsom skogens rekreationsvärden                                                  4. Ekonomiska aspekter, såsom antal arbetstillfällen, skogsbrukarens ekonomiska intäkter, samt nationalekonomiska aspekter.

    Dessa vitt skilda hållbarhetsindikatorer behöver kunna jämföras och vägas mot varandra. Metodik beskrivs för att överföra indikatorerna till en jämförbar, relativ skala, baserat på referensscenarier. Indikatorerna behöver också kunna knytas till storleken på arealen som används för produktion av skogsråvara samt hur mycket skogsråvara som produceras på denna areal.

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  • 12.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Arshad, Ali
    Nissanka, S.P
    Wang, Li-Qiu
    Topmost trees and foremost species underlie tropical forest structure, diversity and biomass through opposing mechanisms2020In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 473, article id 118299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tropical forests play a main role in the global carbon cycle due to their higher exchange capacity of carbon dioxide with the atmosphere than any other forest type on the Earth. In this study, we aimed to explore the relative importance of foremost species and topmost trees in shaping forest structure, diversity and biomass in natural tropical forests. We hypothesized that topmost trees promote but foremost species decline tropical forest structure, diversity and biomass in a changing environment (i.e. the ‘tree overtopping hypothesis’). We formulated three questions to address the proposed hypothesis: (1) Are forest structure, diversity and biomass affected by both foremost species and topmost trees, and what is the magnitude and direction of each relative effect? (2) Are foremost species and topmost trees influenced similarly by multiple environmental factors? (3) How do foremost species and topmost trees mediate the feedbacks of forest structure, diversity and biomass to environmental factors? Using 189 plots data from Sri Lanka, we quantified 16 environmental (9 climate and 7 soil) factors, two indices of the topmost trees (i.e. top 1% large-diameter, and tall-stature) and their combination, four indices of foremost species (i.e. top 1% species' importance value index or each of its three components including either relative basal area, relative frequency or relative density), rarefied species richness, and stand density. We used structural equation modeling to test the proposed hypothesis. Strong positive effects of topmost trees whereas negative to negligible positive effects of foremost species shaped tropical forest structure, diversity and biomass through opposing mechanisms, i.e., the promoting part of big trees and suppressing part of dominant species, respectively. Moreover, forest structure promoted biomass directly and indirectly via forest diversity. Environmental factors (i.e. high climatic water and low soil fertility) increased forest structure, diversity and biomass indirectly via topmost trees but decreased via foremost species. The main novelty or contribution of this study determines that the adverse effects of few foremost (i.e. dominant or abundant) species shaped forest structure, diversity and biomass in tropical forests when simultaneously considered the positive effects of topmost trees. Hence, encouraging topmost trees while managing foremost species might necessarily increase complementarity resource-use within a forest community, leading to positive forest diversity – structure – biomass relationships. We argue that both topmost trees and foremost species might have important influences on forest carbon stock in the context of global climate change.

  • 13.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Eriksson, Flintull Annica
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Malmaeus, Mikael
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Sanctuary, Mark
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Ecosystem Accounting in the Nordic Countries2022Report (Other academic)
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  • 14.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Erlandsson, Martin
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Karlsson, Per Erik
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Holmström, Hampus
    A Conceptual Landscape-Level Approach to Assess the Impacts of Forestry on Biodiversity2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 4214-4214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a conceptual approach to assessing biodiversity impacts of forest wood production with a focus on Nordic managed forests at the landscape level.

    The suggested method for the specification of business-as-usual or environmental quality objectives baselines encourages forest owners to choose forest management options with properties that are more favorable to biodiversity over time.

    Using a BAU baseline approach similar to that used for international climate reporting is a simple but novel approach that makes use of approaches that have already been established.

  • 15.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Holmqvist, Johan
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Naturbaserade lösningar i urbana miljöer: Erfarenheter från Blue Green City Lab2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    IVL Svenska Miljöinstitutet har under perioden 2017 till 2021 deltagit i ett Vinnova-finansierat projekt i Malmö, Blue Green City Lab, som är en testbädd för blågröna lösningar. Projektet har bland annat syftat till att utvärdera både etablerade och ännu inte beprövade metoder av naturbaserade lösningar. Testbädden har inte haft en särskild fysisk infrastruktur som bas, utan de blågröna lösningar som ingått i testbädden har varit förlagda hos verkliga behovsägare på olika platser i Malmö stad. Målsättningen har varit att utveckla en testbädd för hållbara blågröna lösningar som kan attrahera tillräcklig finansiering för att kunna klara sig utan stödfinansiering.

     

    I denna rapport sammanfattar vi några av de utvärderingar och lärdomar som IVL gjort inom ramen för testbäddsprojektet. Projektet Blue Green City Lab har gett ökad kunskap och nya erfarenheter kring hydrologiska parametrar samt utvärdering av ekosystemtjänster och biologisk mångfald i olika system, platser och stadsmiljöer. Det gäller specifikt användning och utvärdering av verktyg för ekosystemtjänstanalys, utvärdering av vattenförbrukning i växtväggar samt dynamiska dagvattenmodeller. Projektet har gett upphov till nya insikter kring vilka aspekter som behöver följas upp och förbättras för att blågröna lösningar ska utgöra användbara verktyg för att hantera de negativa effekterna av ett förändrat klimat.

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  • 16.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Aschebergsgatan 44, 411 33 Gothenburg, Sweden;Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre (GGBC), 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Per Erik
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Aschebergsgatan 44, 411 33 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Martin
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Aschebergsgatan 44, 411 33 Gothenburg, Sweden;Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Åsa
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Aschebergsgatan 44, 411 33 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holmström, Hampus
    Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Indicators of Sustainable Forestry: Methodological Approaches for Impact Assessments across Swedish Forestry2024In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 3331-3331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Approaches for evaluating integrated sustainability impacts in forest management enable the harmonization of environmental, social, and economic considerations. Here, we presenta methodological framework for quantifying and balancing impacts on widely different aspects of sustainability of different future scenarios for forestry in managed forests in Sweden. The method includes indicators for impacts on climate change, biodiversity, and social and economic values. The indicators were normalized to a standardized scale using reference scenarios and target values.

    The proposed method was applied for three different future scenarios for forestry over a 100-year period in two different counties in southern and northern Sweden, respectively. The results show the importance of evaluating indicator performance in forestry across diverse regions of the country and tailoring assessments of individual forest owners to their specific local conditions. Long-term assessments are also crucial due to the varying impacts of indicators over time. The methodologyrequires continuous refinement and can be used as a basis for disclosing the environmental performance of a product based on forest raw materials. It also facilitates the assessment of sustainability in alternative future forestry scenarios and is adaptable to other countries with comparable forestry and forest characteristics.

  • 17.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Lindblom, Erik
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Emilsson, Erik
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Miljöeffekter av elnät och energilagring - En förstudie av nyckelkomponenter i ett framtida fossilfritt energisystem2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna förstudie ger en överblick över den miljöpåverkan som förväntas ske från utbyggnad av elnät och olika energilagringstekniker i ett framtida energisystem. Rapporten beskriver miljöpåverkan för olika delar av livscykeln, dvs. utvinning av råvaror, tillverkning, anläggning, drift och underhåll samt kvittblivning inklusive återanvändning och återvinning.

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  • 18.
    Nilsson, Åsa
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Karlsson, Per Erik
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Andrén, Jacob
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Neuwirth, Josefin
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Erlandsson -, Martin
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Holmström, Hampus
    Visualisering av råvaruflöden och hållbarhet för framtida svenskt skogsbruk: Från skog till produkt2022Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Rapporten, som är framtagen inom Mistra Digital Forest, visar hur visualiseringsverktyget BioMapp kan användas för att analysera påverkan på olika aspekter av hållbarhet från tänkbara alternativa användningar av skogsråvara längs hela värdekedjan, från skog till produkt.

    BioMapp kan förse beslutsfattare med de underlag de behöver för att fatta faktabaserade beslut, för ökad hållbarhet inom svensk skoglig sektor. Rapporten visar exempel på den typ av resultat som kan genereras med BioMapp.

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